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Byzantine Online Course Descriptions

Byzantine Online Course Descriptions

 

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Spring 2019 Credit Classes 

LT 106 Words and Gestures (Fr. David Petras)

A survey of the theology of liturgy from a practical viewpoint. The rituals (gestures) and prayers (words) of the Divine Liturgy, the Presanctified Divine Liturgy and Vespers with the Divine Liturgy are described in detail, as a corporate service of priests, deacons, servers, cantors and congregation. The rationale of this ritual is then discussed from a theological and historical perspective. The student then can learn not only the “how to” but also the “why” of the words and gestures we use. In part 2, the Divine Liturgy from the Great Entrance to the conclusion, the Divine Liturgy with Vespers and the Presanctified Divine Liturgy are surveyed.

(2 hours; 1 semester)

 

DT 104 Post-Chalcedonian Dogmatics (Dr. Jared Goff)

This course will encompass the development of Triadology, Christology, and Pneumatology from the Council of Chalcedon to the modern era. Students will develop an understanding of doctrinal development with an eye to practical application that may be used, applied, and relied upon as a guide in the contemporary Christian experience. Students of this course will engage the following:

  • The ecclesiastical history in the aftermath of Chalcedon, especially the relevant works of Leontius of Byzantium and Leontius of Jerusalem.
  • The relevant works of Severus of Antioch and formation of the miaphysite doctrine of Christ.
  • The relevant works of Emperor Justinian I on Christology and the ecumenical councils from Constantinople II until Nicaea II.
  • The relevant works of Sophronius of Jerusalem and of Maximus the Confessor.
  • The principal works of the monothelites and dyothelites.
  • The history of the iconoclast conflict and readings in the iconodule works of Damascene, along with the Christology and Pneumatology of Damascene as received in the late Byzantine period. The history of reception of Damascene into Latin Scholasticism and Greek Palamism.
  • Modern problems in Triadology, Christology, and Pneumatology, including the essence & energies of God, knowledge of Christ and his beatific vision, and role of Holy Spirit in divinization.
  • The joint declarations of Orthodox and Catholic churches on Christology.

(3 hours; 1 semester)

 

SS 203 Johannine Literature (Dcn. Daniel Dozier)

The course focuses not only on the basic content of the Johannine writings (John’s gospel, his three letters and the book of Revelation) as well as touching on the historical issues beyond the Bible. Students will also develop the skills required to read, interpret, discuss and critically assess these passages in a manner appropriate to intelligent people of faith. Students pay particular attention to John’s unique perspective on the nature and person of the resurrected Jesus in order to enrich their understanding of Jesus in the early church as well as today. The course is intended to foster the students’ development of a personal, loving relationship with God, while at the same time providing a solid scriptural foundation for later pastoral ministry or academic study. Students in this course will develop the following skills:

  • Reading Johannine literature spiritually and historically as well as critically.
  • Understanding Johannine literature in its historical and theological context through an historical-critical lens as well as with the eyes of faith.
  • Reading critically and writing about important issues in contemporary Eastern Christian biblical study.
  • Beginning to articulate the Catholic view of Johannine themes in the current context.

Prerequisite: SS 100

(3 hours; 1 semester)

 

MT 100 Introduction to Moral Theology (Dr. Matthew Minerd)

This course introduces the tradition of moral theology of the Byzantine East into the greater context of the Western ethical tradition. It includes material representing the Eastern Catholic moral tradition and an in-depth understanding of the foundations of Eastern Christian morals. Students will analyze theological principles and provide appropriate pastoral application. By means of the readings, class discussions, and other coursework, at the end of the semester students will be able:

  • To articulate and explain foundational concepts of Christian Ethics with special emphasis throughout the course given to the notion of theosis/divinization as a unifying theme for moral theological reflection. In light of the Christian vocation to the divine life, the following topics will be discussed: virtue, the cardinal and theological virtues, precepts, counsels, beatitudes, happiness, freedom, passions, law, natural law, conscience, the components of a human action (as expressed by both Scholastic thinkers and the Eastern Monastic tradition), discernment, the foundations of man’s moral capacity, and the monastic ideal and ascetical virtues.
  • To recognize and utilize the sources and teachers of Christian Ethics as a basis for ethical reflection: Scripture, the Patristic (especially Eastern) witness, the liturgical life of the Church, and the Magisterium (especially Veritatis Splendor).
  • To evaluate moral actions in terms and concepts utilized by the modern Magisterium: object, circumstances, species, intrinsic evil, etc. Likewise, to integrate this discussion into a framework of ethics that is not act-centric but, instead, is virtue-centric and ultimately centered on the life of grace and theosis.
  • To undertake extensive discussions of the role of conscience in forming moral objects and provide the student with tools for applying these discussions to difficult case-studies in contemporary ethical problems.
  • To account for what Christian ethics is, why it is necessary, and to know how to respond to some Christian objections to systematic Christian ethics, but in a way that takes into account Eastern monastic and patristic traditions.

(3 hours; 1 semester)

 

Spring 2019 Certificate Class

Women in the Bible (Helenanne Hochendoner, M.A.T.)

Focusing on women from both the Old Testament, as well as the New Testament, this elective course explores how women are represented as theologically complex characters in this ancient literature. The focus in the course will be on students’ close engagement with literary, as well as theological, analysis of the biblical texts and their response to that material in light of God’s divine economy. The course is intended to foster students’ development of a personal, loving relationship with God while at the same time providing a solid scriptural foundation for later pastoral ministry or academic study. Students in this course will develop the following skills:

  • Reading the diverse stories of biblical women spiritually and historically as well as critically.
  • Understanding biblical women in their historical and theological context through an historical-critical lens as well as with the eyes of faith.
  • Reading critically and writing about important issues in contemporary Eastern Christian biblical study.
  • Beginning to articulate the Catholic view of biblical/theological anthropological themes in the current context.

 

Summer 2019

Accelerated 7-week program (2 lectures each week)

WR 101: RESEARCH METHODS (Mark Collins, M.F.A.) (begins Monday, June 3, 2019)

This research class provides the basics for successfully performing graduate-level research as well as developing skills for critical reading and writing. This includes analysis and evaluation of print primary as well as secondary resources, online databases, Internet sources and proper research sources and authorities. In addition, students will learn the basics of formatting a document in Microsoft Word including pagination, table of contents, use of linked headings, footnotes and endnotes, inserting images, and captioning. Short lessons on PowerPoint and Excel as research aids are also included. By the end of this course, the learners should be able to:

  • Summarise, paraphrase and quote useful data from a variety of sources.
  • Critically evaluate data/information.
  • Format complex Word documents.
  • Successfully utilize PowerPoint and Excel in support of research.
  • Analyse, comment on and critique scholarly theological literature.

(2 credits)

 

DT 105:  Ecumenism:  Orientale Lumen Conference (begins Monday, July 1, 2019)

This online course offers videotaped presentations of keynote speakers and discussions from the annual Orientale Lumen Conference in Washington DC, a conference dedicated to Catholic-Orthodox dialogue in hopes, “that they all may be one” (John 17:21). Students enrolled in this class for credit will virtually experience the conference speakers as well as roundtable and panel discussions and prepare a paper in conjunction with faculty-led readings, including primary ecumenical statements as well as current publications highlighted at the conference and discussions which focus on ecumenism. Students will learn the following:

  • Engagement with current state of Catholic-Orthodox dialogue.
  • Familiarity with primary ecumenical readings.
  • Critical thinking concerning modern ecumenical topics.
  • Modes of dialogue with significant theological issues from Catholic and Orthodox perspectives.

(1 hour; 1 semester)